Coming into unity

“The true miracle lies in our eagerness to allow, appreciate, and honor the uniqueness, and freedom, of each sentient being to sing the song of their heart.”

 ~Amir Ray

No matter who you voted for, one message was clear throughout the presidential election: we have acted as a divided nation for too long.

Going forward there is one culprit that will keep us divided, not only politically, but even amongst our family, friends and acquaintances. That culprit is JUDGMENT.

The people who trigger us, and cause us the most angst, are often the ones we judge most harshly (or who have judged us most harshly). Later, we often learn that these very same people have been our greatest teachers, helping us heal deep wounds, grow, and reclaim our worthiness in new ways.

Take a moment to ponder those who hurt you, or challenged you, and ask yourself, “What lessons did I learn?”

  • Did you learn to speak up in a new way or refrain from overreacting too quickly?
  • Were you able to become empowered from within, by setting clear intentions for desired outcomes?
  • Could you champion yourself and/or find others to cheer you on?
  • How did you change your story from being a victim to becoming a creator of your life? (Look how many people took action to vote in historic numbers this election).

Pause and Stay in Neutral

We also sometimes judge others for having different gifts than we do, rather than valuing the uniqueness of each and every person placed in front of us.

Instead of being threatened by others’ talents or decisions–because their paths diverged from the course you charted for yourself (or even for them)–try looking at their life choices with intrigue.

Differences can enhance our lives by expanding beyond our singular perspective. When in doubt, pause before uttering a word. Drop your ego’s need to “be right” about your position, and become an observer. Imagine what would make another person think or act so differently from you.

Staying curious beyond judgment opens minds, hearts and lives to unlimited possibilities.

In connectedness,

Gail

PRE-HOLIDAY SPECIAL: Sign up for my six-session coaching package by November 22 and receive a 10 percent discount. Email gailjones@claimyourworthiness.com to learn more.

WHAT’S NEW: See my latest media interviews about claiming your worthiness on my Press Page.

 

My talented photographer friend, Judy Miller, captured the above photo of the statue of  the “hear no evil, see no evil, speak no evil” monkeys at the Doi Suthep Temple in Chaing Mai, Thailand.  

 

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  • Meg says:

    Well said Gail – I love this message!

  • Doug Cam says:

    Gail,
    You’ve stuck gold once more!

    What a great and timely message!

    Often times our egos color our perception of reality! Those who draw forth the most emotions from us, are our greatest teachers!

    By changing our perception, we change our reality. By acknowledging that those who cause us the most angst, are merely drawing out our own insecurities and fears, we can begin to understand our own deeply seated prejudices and reflect on our own growth path and journey.

    Hopefully, by using this knowledge we can begin to develop and grow ourselves into a higher vibrational energy level being.

    Great vision as always!

    • Gail Kauranen Jones says:

      Thanks, Doug. We’re all embracing a major life transformation, and the more we reflect inward, the greater our gains will be. Blessings, Gail

  • Lisa May says:

    Beautiful and profound, as always Gail. To find the momentary pause between stimulus and reaction is one of the greatest gifts we can receive in our life. It’s from this place of awareness that we can unwire the familiar, deeply memorized responses, to let go and grow. Thanks for your consistent messages to help us all live better!

    • Gail Kauranen Jones says:

      Lisa: Great explanation on using “the power of pause” to create anew. I also appreciate your valuing the messages in my blog posts, and my commitment to contributing to the well-being of others. Blessings, Gail

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